Pope Cites ‘Crisis of Credibility’ in Message to U.S. Bishops on Sex Abuse

Image
Pope Francis in St. Peter’s Square on Monday. He said the scandal had caused “division and dispersion” among the bishops.CreditCreditFilippo Monteforte/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

ROME — Pope Francis told United States bishops on Thursday to set aside their differences so they could confront a widespread “crisis of credibility” stemming from the sexual abuse scandal.

In a letter addressed to American bishops, who are on a weeklong retreat near Chicago, Francis urged church leaders to listen to “the pain of our people,” overcome the conflicts among them and come up with solutions.

“Credibility will be the fruit of a united body,” Francis wrote in the letter, which was released to the news media on Thursday.

The closed-door spiritual retreat precedes a gathering at the Vatican next month of the heads of some 110 bishops’ conferences, aimed at finding common ground in dealing with a global scandal that is overshadowing Francis’s papacy.

In the United States, the scandal has been focused on the church’s failure to discipline bishops, either for perpetrating sexual abuse or for covering it up. The executive committee of American bishops offered a set of proposals to keep bishops accountable, including creating a review board made up largely of lay people who would hear accusations against bishops.

But that proposal divided the American bishops, and ultimately did not have approval from the Vatican either.

The American bishops have also been split in their attitudes about Francis, with a few even openly criticizing the pope for muddying church doctrine on issues like homosexuality and divorce. The pope did not refer directly to these fissures in his letter to the bishops.

Critics have accused the pope of failing to follow through on his promise to rid the church of sexual abusers and to discipline those who covered up for them.

Francis’s letter to the bishops publicly acknowledged the divisions among American church leaders, noting that “tensions and conflicts” had emerged over the handling of sexual abuse cases.

Though the abuse crisis is a global phenomenon, recent investigations in the United States have underscored the gravity of the scandal. A grand jury report in Pennsylvania last year found that 301 priests had sexually abused minors for some seven decades. Attorneys general in at least 16 other states have initiated investigations.

“The hurt caused by these sins and crimes has also deeply affected the communion of bishops, and generated not the sort of healthy and necessary disagreements and tensions found in any living body, but rather division and dispersion,” the pope wrote.

Only about 200 bishops are attending a retreat that the pope himself had insisted on, out of more than 450 active and retired bishops, according to a spokeswoman for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. A list of attendees has not been made public.

The pope said there was an urgent need “for a renewed and decisive approach to resolving conflicts.”

But the letter also suggested that the pope might not see eye-to-eye with the American bishops on policies they proposed last year, including a new code of conduct for bishops and a hotline run by a third party to report problems about bishops’ conduct.

“Loss of credibility calls for a specific approach, since it cannot be regained by issuing stern decrees or by simply creating new committees or improving flow charts, as if we were in charge of a department of human resources,” the pope wrote.

Francis met with United States bishops in September and suggested that they hold a meeting for spiritual reflection as a necessary step in responding to the “crisis of credibility.” He also asked the leaders of the American church to cancel their previously scheduled November meeting in Baltimore, and hold a spiritual retreat instead. But the bishops, aware of the anger in the pews, insisted on going through with the meeting so they could vote on a set of measures they had come up with to hold bishops accountable.

But once the bishops were gathered in Baltimore, they were stunned to learn that the Vatican had asked them not to vote on any of their proposals. The Associated Press reported this week that the Vatican said it had acted because American bishops’ leaders had not discussed the provisions with the Holy See beforehand.

In a letter to Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, dated Nov. 11, Cardinal Marc Ouellet, prefect of the Congregation of Bishops, complained that the draft proposals had arrived at the Vatican only four days before the bishops’ meeting.

Francis had initially told the leaders of the United States church that he would like to be present during the retreat, but he said Thursday that he had not been able to participate “for logistical reasons.” Instead he sent his own preacher, the Capuchin Friar Raniero Cantalamessa, to direct the retreat.

In the letter, Francis said that the church’s credibility in the United States had been “seriously undercut and diminished” by the “sins and crimes” of the abuse scandals, but “even more by the efforts made to deny or conceal them.”

Cardinal DiNardo sent the pope a message on the opening of the retreat asking him to pray for the bishops, who “carry with us these days the pain and hope of all who may feel let down by the church.”

Elizabeth Dias contributed reporting from Washington, and Laurie Goodstein from New York.

Advertisement

Let’s block ads! (Why?)